Quantcast

Double Tanka

Sharing Stories

Pierre and April, Summer 1958

A tanka like a haiku is a poem determined by the number of syllables in each line: 5/7/5/7/7 for tankas. Haikus are 5/7/5, for example. This no title double tanka is unrhymed.

Poetry challenge accepted: Tanka—Haiku from short story: DAYS AT THE POOL.

[For the information of readers, I’ve been challenging April to do harder and harder forms of poetry. She, as always, accepts challenges and rises victorious from them all. Since it has ten, rather than five lines, it is not formally considered a tanka…t’ank you very much. Ariele Huff]

preteen arrow shape

skim pool surface like flat stone

lifeguard throne overseer

rival image Gidget or Daisy Mae

calendar girl swimsuit too small

lifeguard watch her blush

float gently youthful freedom

illusion nudity to rescue

eyes focus on new temptation

swimmers vanishing from view

summertime long ago

first crush almost fell off perch

hot season day swim


SUMMER 1958

April Ryan

The picture is me and Pierre, (he's about 2 years old). I'm sure in the summer of 1958 when I was twelve, the shadow taking the picture is Mom.

April Ryan is a blossoming Washington poet…serrated leaves and elliptical petals.

SHARING STORIES is a weekly column for and about the 50 plus crowd living in the Puget Sound region. Send your stories and photos to ariele@comcast.net. Tell local or personal stories; discuss concerns around aging and other issues; share solutions, good luck, and reasons to celebrate; poems are fine too. Pieces may be edited or excerpted. We reserve the right to select among pieces. Photos are always a plus and a one-sentence bio is requested (where you live, maybe age or career, retired status, etc.).

SHARING STORIES is featured on www.northwestprimetime.com, the website for Northwest Prime Time, a monthly publication for baby boomers, seniors, retirees, and those contemplating retirement. The newspaper can be found in the greater Seattle area and other Puget Sound locations. For more information, call 206-824-8600 or visit www.northwestprimetime.com. To find other SHARING STORIES articles on this website type "sharing stories" in the search function above.

Editor's Picks